Get More Chokes, Armbars and TAPS With This Exercise

 

In my last post I shared a video that I dubbed my “Lowlights” video…

I asked you to guess why I named it such and Jay_G got it right with his Comment:

Because Jay_G watched the video and left his Comment, he’s going to win the new Python Power Program that I’m releasing on May 30. [Congratulations Jay_G! I’ve got your email and I’ll be in touch when the program is live with your D/L link]

That just goes to show that it pays to read the articles, watch the videos and COMMENT.

Maybe next time you’ll win something cool, but you won’t win anything if you don’t participate. You might even get that chance right now in this article… Read the whole thing to be sure… 🙂

Now you may be curious as to what this Python Power Program is all about…

Well, after that tournament, I had to re-evaluate what went on…

Like Jay_G said, I had full mount, back with hooks in and lots of opportunities to finish some of the matches off.

But I couldn’t do it!

Have you ever caught a submission only to
lose it because you just didn’t have
the power to finish it off?

I’m embarrassed to say that I know exactly how frustrating this is, especially if you catch them with a super-slick setup…

Or worse, after failing to get the tap, YOU get caught by someone you know you’re better than, simply because you spent all your energy ending up gassed and vulnerable.

In my Lowlights Video, I finished 4th out of over 50 competitors. Not bad for only training regularly for 3 months prior.

But I wasn’t happy…

Not because I didn’t win, but because I couldn’t finish any of my opponents off, despite having numerous opportunities to do so. I just didn’t have the power or stamina to force the tap.

My conditioning to compete was there, but I didn’t have the specific fitness necessary to finish submissions.

That’s when I vowed to never let this happen again and put my 4 year $40,000 dollar university degree to work. I spent hours and hours researching and developing a program designed for one purpose only – submission strength and stamina.

I never wanted to catch my prey only to have them escape my clutches again…

I came up with new exercises and a program and was my own guinea pig. I followed it to the letter and drastically improved my submission strength and stamina, which allowed me to get way more tapouts in training.

Here’s one of the exercises to really improve your Submission Specific Strength:


[jwplayer config=”560×340 (posts)” mediaid=”3042″]

But then, I stopped training BJJ. A lot of things happened in a short period of time – I moved to Toronto, I got engaged, and more MMA fighters like Claude Patrick were contacting me to train them so I basically forgot about the program.

Fast forward a couple of years and a few days ago, I was going through my backup hard drive, looking for the movie ‘Fist of Legend’ because the post I made about the ‘Best Martial Arts Movies of All Time‘ got me excited to watch it again.

When searching for this epic movie (that you MUST watch if you haven’t yet seen it) I stumbled upon a file called ‘submission strength.doc’.

I opened it up and saw the program that I just told you about. I looked it over and while it was good, I’d learned a few things since I’d wrote it and decided to incorporate these things to bring the program up to speed.

Now, it’s better than ever and guaranteed to help you get more chokes, more armbars and more TAPS than ever before…

I’ve also been busy at work filming videos of all of the exercises in the program since many of them I invented specifically for this program.

Well, I’m putting the final touches on the program now and I can’t wait to get it in your hands.

But before we continue, I’ve got a question for you…

Why do you think I named the
program ‘Python Power’?

Let me know in the Comments section below… 🙂

Oh and hit ‘Like’ to share this awesome exercise with your pals. Thanks.

———– ** IMPORTANT UPDATE ** ————

The Python Power program is now LIVE! Check it out:

Powerful Submissions Start Here

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Máy tập thể dụcSantiago SanchezEricJosemmDedication + BJJ Workout = Gold Medal! Recent comment authors
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Máy tập thể dục

You could possibly definitely view your skills inside pictures you are submitting. The world desires of much more passionate internet writers as you who are certainly not reluctant to say the way they feel. Continuously abide by your current center.

Santiago Sanchez
Santiago Sanchez

Because it gives you the ability to choke people with the same power as a python

Josemm
Josemm

Man looks like the link to the program is broken it gives me a not found screen.

Eric
trackback

[…] Josh continued training BJJ and most recently used my Python Power program in preparation for the Pan Pacific Jiu Jitsu Championships, where he took GOLD! Ultimate […]

Micah
Micah

Hi Eric,

Im a BJJ black belt and active competitor, have fought pro-mma in the past but now just compete bjj. Would you recomend this course or your ultimate mma conditioning course?
Im looking for something to use for my regular conditioning work but also then to prep for comps.
Thanks in advance.
Micah

ramon abrego
ramon abrego

i called it.

trackback

[…] this post to find out how you can win a copy of my Python Power […]

Gaz
Gaz

Gutted, I was going to go with the Hulk Hogan reference as well, because doing this program will give you 24inch Pythons!! I know that probably isnt the real reason but I think it’s the funniest and that guy should therefore win.

ernie
ernie

Loop a towel through the handle of a Kettelbell and you can do the same exercise. You can also do overhead triceps extensions the same way.

trackback

[…] followup last post where I shared the Towel Bicep Curl exercise, I’ve got another great exercise to use to add elbow-popping submission power AND […]

Justin
Justin

The twisting towel curl is sick, Eric! Show us some more!

Kevin
Kevin

Gotta agree with most everyone above, the python is a natural submission master, born to submit it’s enemies to death. Can’t wait for more details about this program!

Quick question though, I’m doing the MMA 8 week training camp right now(on 5 weeks out) and have figured out that my biggest weakness is raw power. Would it be a good idea for me to do this program after I complete the training camp?

Jakob S

The simple fact is when a python has you in its grip. It will never let go of you.
Which is why the program is called Python power. Because the program will give you so much endurance you will never let go of your opponent. Not until he taps atleast or the judge pushes you off hehe.

phrog
phrog

I like Gregg’s answer too, but I’m in agreance with the majority. This is about submissions, and Python snakes are too. They pretty much submit you to death. However, there may be a second reason. You mentioned that using this will help you make your opponents squeak. Perhaps it was also named after the Monty Python series? I’m sure they did a lot of squeaking too. And both an opponents squeak, and Monty’s squeak would be very funny.

Patrick
Patrick

Easy. Once a python gets hold of you, there’s no getting out of it … unless you’re Steve Irwin

MattM
MattM

Python power, cause just like they described Royce, the point of BJJ is to constrict your opponent until he has no other option but to submit. Your program is designed to provide you with the power base to put your technique into practice.

jeff mann

Python power is a great name! When I watch the Discovery channel I always see the constrictors choking out some helpless victim! Exactly what we’re looking 4 when grappling!

Matt
Matt

Eric, I love strength and conditioning tips and feel they are definitely important in grappling, but everything I have ever been taught has indicated that trying to catch or escape subs by increasing your strength is the wrong mindset. I feel that if skills are equal then the body makes a big difference, but I don’t really think that adding strength to my forearms and biceps will allow to to finish more chokes and armbars, b/c those are submissions that are approached from a perspective of leverage not brute strength. I suppose if I was stronger then maybe I could muscle on a sub and make someone of a lower skill level tap, but I don’t think that is the key to catching the really good people. What are your thoughts on this? I do think adding this workout to my program will help with grip strength and can be… Read more »

Eric

Matt – I agree 100% that technical skill should be trained, first and foremost.

But once you’ve got the technique, adding strength and stamina ON TOP will get you more subs than technique alone. I’m sure you’ve had the experience where you could’ve caught someone with a sub but had to give it up because you didn’t have the strength or stamina? I know I have.

Basically, S&C is another piece of the puzzle, another weapon to be put in a complete (mixed) martial artist’s toolbox.

Justin
Justin

Having a Judo black belt and now getting into BJJ tournaments and MMA competition I’ve got to disagree. There is a mindset that you must develop in training, as in class rolling and doing drills, wherein you try to use as little strength as possible, and this steadily improves your technique. But for competition you have to do your homework too – lots of sport specific conditioning. Anyone who thinks tournament BJJ isn’t an athletic sport is a fool. So your skill training and your conditioning are the opposite, in your skill training you minimize exertion to maximize efficiency – as in conservation of energy (a primary BJJ principle), in conditioning you want to push yourself to your limits to increase your reserves when you’re on the mat. When you’re actually on the mat, you spend those reserves wisely, but you want to have as much as you can! Same… Read more »

levi
levi

it increases your overall bicep and forarm power if you dont have any strength or power in your biceps you cant squeze very hard thats how i won my first fight from having strong biceps the guy stuck his head under my arm my left arm at that and i didnt lock anything up i just squezed hard as i could and he was tapping away

Jon Fisher
Jon Fisher

Because

A:
Python is an interpreted, general-purpose high-level programming language[5] whose design philosophy emphasizes code readability.

And your using that to design your software.(Not very likely)

B:
The Python’s prey is killed by a process known as constriction; after an animal has been grasped to restrain it, a number of coils are hastily wrapped around it. Then, by applying and maintaining sufficient pressure to prevent it from inhaling, the prey eventually succumbs due to asphyxiation.

(i.e. tap out or it’s lights out!)

C.
And finally my favorite. It will help you get 24 inch “Pythons” like Hulk Hogan!! Oh yeah brother!

Brad
Brad

It is unbelievable to me how hard it is to maintain a dominant position in BJJ. The static muscle endurance needed, grip strength, and just how “heavy” and constricting my instructor “feels” is amazing. Being like a python in BJJ is being able to squeeze and fatigue the other until you can strike/submit. Thanks Erik.

Greg
Greg

Is it because it makes your dick bigger ?

Eric

I wish!!!

xena both
xena both

Oh this one is too fun too fierce to pass I think, so here is my 2 cents on why you named it Python Power! Well besides from all the obvious and logical answers reasons given above,such as speed,strenght, power, endurance,tactics,stamina and yes the coolness of the name..I think…you also named it this way because..the highly adaptable character of a python to once environment(in this case opponent game) so he or she can submission ANYONE no matter what size or even strenght!!! And oh yeah talking about the he or she thing…don’t mess with a female-python…so I think you also named it Python Power because it can be use by both genders!! 😉

Eugene
Eugene

I think it’s called python power because it will help you develop the ability/power to hold a clinch/ submission like a Python. That, all in, balls out, no fear, no doubt kind of power. When the submission is in, its in and there’s no escaping, all your opponent can do is tap out, or die! Like what you’d experience when fighting a Python (a python does not crush it’s prey, it smothers it with non stop power and endurance).

ken
ken

I thinks its called python power because pythons set up an attack on their prey silently and tactically without the prey realising they are there. This sneak attack combined with the pythons speed and power of initiating the movement aswell as the strength and endurance to complete the kill once they have their prey is how they are so effective in their environment. If the program was simply about squeezing strength and nothing else it would have been called ‘boa constrictor strength’ as boas only contrict their prey when its moves as to allow the prey to slip into the perfrect position and to preserve energy for when they have to digest the prey while pythons simply squeeze until they get the kill. Python power also sounds cool as hell.

seb974
seb974

I think it’s called “Python Power” because you can’t escape a python squeezing you, no matter how hard you try. The more you’ll try to escape the more it’ll tighten its grip and finally constrict you to death. It’s a metaphor for a deadly strength and endless muscular endurance.

mgchild
mgchild

Is this an old Hulk Hogan reference? The “say your prayers, take your vitamins, and get 24″ pythons” slogan from back in the day?

Or did I just severely date myself (lol)..

cork_boi
cork_boi

The programe name has two parts, python: because a python is a grappling animal and has all the characterises described above: flexibility and strength, etc. But you also use the term POWER which implies strength and SPEED. The programe was originally called submission strength but I reckon when you tweaked it you added speed to the equation and that’s why it’s called python power. Oh yeah it sounds cool too 😉

Joe
Joe

Everyone above me has the python analogies down and how they would be associated with a match but I’m fairly certain the ‘python’ is referring to one’s arm. This program will most likely help to develop strength, speed, power, and muscular endurance in your arms…..so you don’t catch someone in a choke and then burn your arms out! Happens a lot.

Vince
Vince

Reminds me of someone at my training we call an “anaconda”, you get sucked into his game not thinking he’s doing much and then when you realise it it’s too late, he’s got you where he wants you, squeezes, chokes, tapout.

Vid looks great for gi in bjj. Already enjoy your other programs i use too!

bob g
bob g

I say you name it so that you can silently, powerfully, attack w/o warning and then slowly squeeze your opponent into tapping.

Kris
Kris

Sounds like everyone who had already commented was thinking the same as I, however when dealing with a Python the noramaly attack your arm, leg or if your really unlucky your head and heck (as I would in BJJ).

Matthew
Matthew

I’m thinking that the program is designed to give you three characteristics of a python: strength, endurance, and flexibility. All three of these are important for getting dominant positions and finishing off submissions.

Steve C
Steve C

You named the program “Python Power” because the exercises help you gain the strength in the areas you need to submit an opponent easier. “I never wanted to catch my prey only to have them escape my clutches again…” A python has the power to wrap around and squeeze their prey into… well death (but we go for a submission/tap). Once wrapped around their prey, the python will not let it escape. Which is what you aim to achieve with your program “Python Power”.

Mikey
Mikey

Its called “Python Power” because following the program will give your the strength and ability to squeeze your opponents and get the “kill” (submission) just like a python snake squeezes its prey.

Doug
Doug

A python can exert hundreds of pounds of force per square inch, and surprisingly maintain that force in excess of an hour (thank you Animal Planet).

I’m guessing this program develops not only strength, but also muscular endurance to maintain that strength til the tap occurs.

Anyway, that’s my story and I’m sticking to it….