4 years, 1 big disappointment

The 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver juts finished up, and what a finish! There were so many lessons to be learned, but one story sticks out in my mind which I’ll get to in a sec…

The men’s hockey team won gold in a nail-biter of a game that ended in overtime over a tough US squad…

After the win, people were spilling out on the streets (I was one of them) to yell and act like a fool… Good times!

But when all is said and done, there’s one story that I’ll remember forever…


It’s not the figure skater who pulled off a bronze when her mother passed away the day she arrived in Vancouver, although I won’t forget that one either…

If you fight, or especially if you are going to have a first fight, you must pay attention to this story…

After a race where a Canadian medal hopeful wound up taking 5th as opposed to Gold or Silver, she was broken.

She was crying, looked downright depressed, and felt like she let the whole country down.

She even apologized for not getting a medal…

Imagine that – you trained for 4 years as your full-time job, your hopes, dreams, and the expectations of an entire country are weighing on your shoulders…

It came down to one short race, where medalists are separated from non-medalists by 1/10th of a second…

1/10th of a second!!!

When the margin between victory and defeat is so small, there are so many ‘shoulda’ and ‘woulda’s’ that will run through your head…

But here’s the thing…

She surrounded herself with the best coaches, trainers, and training partners…

She moved to live near the training centre…

She trained full-time for 4 years and gave it her best…

When it comes down to it, 5th in the world is pretty damn good…

In time she’ll be able to hold her head high and she’ll grow and get stronger from the experience…

So Eric… When it’s your chance to show what you’re made of…

Regardless of the result…

Are you going to be able to say, “I did everything I could’ve done, and gave it my all”??

Because if you’re not, you’ll regret it.

So make sure you’re doing everything you can, NOW.

Don’t leave anything to chance.

Surround yourself with the best coaches, trainers, and training partners.

Give it your all in training, every opportunity you get.

And you’ll be able to let your talent and skill shine through…

Then, under those bright lights in the centre of the cage, you too will be able to hold your head up high…

And maybe the ref will be holding your hand high too…

ultimate-coverDon’t leave your strength and conditioning to chance…

Find a quality coach in your area, or if you can’t, let me be in your corner:

=> http://www.UltimateMMAStrength.com

 

Train smart my friend,

Eric

 

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More wisdom from Eric: Picking the right coach and team is important. Prior to MMA there were a lot of charlatans out there. Back in the 90’s it was common to see 2nd Dan Black belts who were overweight and had no cardio. I always thought this was a problem especially compared to boxers. I met this instructor who was super fit: he ran marathons and could do 100’s of push ups without stopping. I was so impressed that I trained with him for 2 years. Pity his techniques didn’t actually work in a real fight (as I found out the hard way). If are going to train your ass off, make sure you are with the right people first. Don’t forget to assess your coach and teams performance as much as your own.