Our 5 Core Values In-Depth

Here’s the vid:

After watching the video, I’d love to hear your answer to the question…

What characteristics do YOU think make
up the Martial Artist’s Mindset?

I look forward to hearing your thoughts in the Comments below and in a few days, I’ll share the characteristics I believe define it and exactly who I want to work with.

– E

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EmanuelChris McCargarDeanThijsJamie Recent comment authors
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Emanuel
Emanuel

I have always admired the implications of a martial arts gym. The mere act of walking into one and asking for instruction is an instant sign of humility; forfeiting that someone knows better than you. For those that go the distance in their training, it really says alot about their character. It speaks that they’re disciplined to a some degree, although undoubtebly to a degree greater than your common person. I also admire that someone who goes to a MA gym recognizes that the value of a person is not how they look, but what they are capable of. That is the order of a life of a martial artist or just someone who should be proud of themselves. First humility, then discipline, and finally capable. Personally I enjoy MMA and breaking (dancing), which is why I focus my training around speed, stamina, stength, and range of motion.

Chris McCargar

I believe that the mindset is as vaied as the individuals who train… however there is some commonality among those who “play” at it and those who are serious.

I’ve trained since the 70’s and for the most part, I don’t think the kids today would train as hard. I’ve been a guest at clubs where you hear them groan or complain about doing another set of exercise. They all want to learn a spinning back kick and be Bruce Lee on Day One. In a society that thrives on instant gratification, that’s not too surprising…. which brings me to mindset.

To succeed, I believe one needs a “knockout” combo of patience, desire, persistence, determination, understanding and compassion.

Dean
Dean

Hi Eric,

For me, the Martial Artist Mindset is just like marriage and having kids. Everything is intertwined into the other with a common and shared purpose, ever changing and growing. I found the following statement on a martial arts website and it resonated that much with me that I use it now as my own personal motto…”Remember, your training never stops. It is not enough to know, you must understand. It is not enough to talk, you must do. It is not enough to wear your uniform, you must sweat. Use every class to create a stronger, wiser, healthier version of yourself”. And that’s how I train and keep a very happy family and work life balance, which becomes even more important when the little ones come along!!

Thijs
Thijs

For me that would be mindfulness (open, mild, non judging awareness), (self)compassion, discipline, focus, humble and playful.

Jamie
Jamie

Hi Eric how about a programme for 40+ dads who want to keep in shape and as you are about to find out do not have as much time as they used to …..ps what about a name ? Jamie.

Eric

Hey Jamie,

I’ve been thinking about that a bit more…

My Ultimate MMA S&C fits the bill as you can get it done in 2 days/week, but I’ve been thinking about something more frequent but less time for each workout, like 6 days/week where each workout including warmup takes 20 minutes.

Does this idea interest you?

Jay
Jay

I really enjoyed this presentation Eric and I think it reflects the mind set of a true martial artist. In that the openness to learning (otherwise known as HUMILITY) and the inner drive to improving through dedicated application of that learning (otherwise known as COMMITMENT) both support the heart of the matter. The reason and purpose for doing it in the first place; expressing truly the self’s energy in order to warm and enlighten (otherwise known as COHERENCE) of which integrity is a part. Enjoy.

Divij Sood
Divij Sood

Really enjoyed this video. Refreshing. Felt good to have a glimpse into the mind of Eric Wong, to see how he thinks. And the video was really well presented. I liked how you presented your different core values. Made it more interesting than just watching you talk standing in front of a whiteboard. Its good to see a businessman giving more priority to such values and producing quality content with integrity rather than focusing on how to get a lot of customers and sell them stuff. A suggestion though – I do think you should spend some time and focus a bit on marketing. How you present yourself, how you present your programs and your products to customers/potential customers. Its good to see you’re not going in the “Mike Chang direction” of aggressive advertisement of complete bullshit and instead focusing on actually creating quality products and making sure you do… Read more »

Eric

Thanks for the feedback Divij I’ll definitely keep your advice about marketing in mind! Definitely agree about Steve Jobs – he was a master.

Divij Sood
Divij Sood

It really amused me hearing you say your baby would be lying in a “supine” position. Mark of a true fitness expert?

LJ
LJ

Eric,

Great video. You’ve really advanced and I like where you are headed. Really pumped to see your new product.

I am not a martial artist but I’ve trained with them. I’ve admired their humility, poise, and physical/mental fortitude to persevere through adversity.

Congrats on you and your wife’s baby!!!

Thomas Burnett
Thomas Burnett

Eric,

I think different martial arts require different mindsets. Though successful martial artists probably have a few things in common. I believe an inner drive to succeed, and an enjoyment of competition are shared by successful martital artists as well as successful people in general. This doesn’t necessarily mean getting in a ring or on a stage to compete, but competing against others or yourself in training to strive for consistent improvement.

Tommy

Robbie
Robbie

Hi Eric,
Really enjoying your latest blogs.
My interpretation of the martial artist’s mindset is a mixture of drive and determination, desire to improve and challenge oneself, dedication, focus, philosophical approach (depending on the martial artist!) and hopefully a willingness to help your training partner and crew be the best they can be.
Good luck with the baby too dude.

Matt
Matt

The openness to learn and be the best you can be. Fighting like a black belt but having the attitude to learn like a white belt does. Striving to be better than you were yesterday whether it be competition, technique, fitness,flexibility or even personal life, etc.
– Judo and BJJ Athlete

bender
bender

Discipline. One must go through more than they believe they can endure to succeed, I think the only way to do that is to stay focused. I also believe an open mind and a willingness to learn make up a martial artists mindset.

Kenny
Kenny

Eric, First I’d like to say that watching the video, it’s apparent that a life changing event is about to take place for you in a few weeks. It’s almost like watching a replay of the shift in my personal outlook in life when I found out I was going to be a father for the first time. It does make you step back and really take a good hard look at life. You realize quickly where your priorities should be since life is no longer all about yourself…it’s all about that little dude or dudette and what you need to do so they grow up happy and healthy. It’s a pretty awesome thing, so congatulations and enjoy. As far as a martial artist’s mindset, I think that’s a pretty multifaceted mind set to have. I’ll try not to get into too many of them so I don’t blow up… Read more »

Danny Y

Eric,

My first martial arts teacher Makoto Kabayama taught me that a martial artist is a keeper of the peace.

Being a martial artists means having the discipline and strength to walk away from unnecessary confrontation.

D

Ken
Ken

I think there are two points that are particularly vital: COMMITMENT and HUMILITY. “Commitment” implies a determination to be the best you possibly can be and to make whatever sacrifices are needed to achieve this. By “humility” I mean always being open to learning – being alert to learn something new, being willing to change to a better way if you find it, not being locked in to any given way of doing things as if that way is part of your personality, always realizing you are way short of knowing everything.