1 Little-Known Secret to Endless Cardio

I’m baaaaaack with another Ask EricWongMMA segment.

But I almost didn’t make it back.

I was in the airport waiting around and was making my way to the departure gates.

I walked through some doors, thinking they led to my gate, but when I looked back I thought, “Uh, oh” because they had those do not enter signs – you know the big red circle with the white line through the middle.

DAMN YOU Chinese genes and your malfunctioning GPS for a brain for leading me astray (yet again).

I asked one of the workers where to go by pointing to the gate on my ticketand he simply pointed to go that way to the end and up… When I got up there, I realized I WAS BACK WHERE I’D STARTED.

I had to check in again, go through security and sprint to the gate. When I arrived, they looked a little upset and said I might have to stay another night in Barcelona. But they eventually let me on and my wife greeted me by laughing at me.

Barcelona was a lot of fun and is very beautiful as well, as you may have seen in my Muscleups in Barcelona post.

But all good things must come to an end and every ending is a new beginning so this week’s Ask EricWongMMA question came from Steve from New Zealand and I throw in some clips and relate my answer to this past UFC, specifically the two light heavyweight main event bouts.

He asked about how to not tense up when sparring, and in answering it, I reveal 1 “Little-Known” Secret to Endless Cardio…

Discover this secret in today’s Ask EricWongMMA video:

The exercise I show you in the video above is best performed daily. It won’t feel like much. But it works.

The keys are to:

  • Inhale, focusing on expanding the area below your nipples while relaxing your neck and shoulders
  • Breathe in through the nose and out through either the nose or mouth
  • Practice regularly!

If you try too hard, you might even feel an intense shooting pain in your left chest/neck – this is a “spasm” in your diaphragm and nothing to worry about. It’ll go away after a minute or so.

I’m going to do a post on the “hyperventilation” concept next week so stay tuned for that… It’s going to be pretty cool.

As always, I appreciate your Likes, Shares and Comments – do so below.

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j.davila
j.davila

Good video. Good advice. That same technique has helped me also get through tough times mentally…instead of getting tensed up and losing my cool, I relax and breath and figure out better ways to do things. Oh yea, and “new project” huh? Bro, you’re like an expensive girlfriend making me spend all my money lol. Can’t wait till it comes out tho. My fat ass needs to get back on the wagon now that I’m home again. Later.

Steve
Steve

Great info, practice and implementation are in order!!
Thanks

Justin
Justin

Yes indeed, breathing is the key to everything. It’s wild in the fight community how much emphasis is placed on having enough “cardio” development… and the idea of pacing yourself, energy efficient body mechanics, being more relaxed, and the importance of breathing is rarely brought up at all. In sparring sessions usually your coach is giving you pointers on techniques, what you should do in a certain situation as opposed to what you did… and if you gas it’s because you need to work harder on your “cardio” workouts… I would say otherwise.

Dominick
Dominick

Eric. You reminded me of an experiment I tried a couple of years ago but wasn’t patient enougth to continue. I wanted to do 55 rapid burpees non-stop for time but gassed out at 20 reps due to short rapid breaths. So I thought I would concentrate on maintaining a pattern of breaths coinciding with the burpee moves. When the pattern broke I would stop until I could control the breathing pattern again. My thinking was this would build my concentration to avoid discomfort and breath endurance.

Thanks for this idea. I’ll be going back to it again.

Dominick

Jose M.
Jose M.

Hi Eric, the word “endess” on the blackboard laks the “L”. 😉

Cork-boi
Cork-boi

Good info Eric as always. I came to the same conclusion watching the sprinting in the Olympics. Look at Usain Bolt, everybody says that he could run even faster because he sooo relaxed when he’s racing. He even show boats at the end of the 100 metre final. I reckon that why he’s so fast, because he doesn’t have the tension the other runners are displaying.

Satya
Satya

hey Eric, u got it spot on, I got a question for you. What about the technique where we are breathing out with every punch. When the punches are really fast we shallow breath. How would you tackle that one.

Smurf
Smurf

Yo that was proper, i noticed when i just started sparring in boxing i used to get gassed off of adrenaline and nerves alone and i was in good shape, i noticed i could hit the bag endlessly and not get tired and my high intensity interval had a much higher work rate than my sparring sessions and i wouldn’t get tired ’til the third to fifth interval, but when i hopped in the ring i’d get tired after 2 rounds sometimes 1 round. But as i got more experienced and had some tough sparring sessions i learned to relax. I think its simply because i got more comfortable and confident in my skills and it transitioned to my cardio. that’s why i feel it is important for trainers to have their trainee’s get in the ring with more experienced guys and have them experience some pressure so they no… Read more »

Eric J
Eric J

I have experienced exactly what you did. My mental state gassed me out, not my level of conditioning. It takes time to get passed that. Thanks for pointing that out.