How to Continue Adaptations? [QUIZ]

Got a short quiz for you this weekend, so it’s not all about ruining brain cells and vegging out.

Gotta keep the ol’ noggin’ working!

Plus, it’s your chance to synthesize and integrate some of the knowledge you’ve picked up from reading the articles and studying what I’ve been posting for you here on the blog.

Watch the short 87 second video for the little quiz of your training knowledge:

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LEAVE YOUR ANSWERS BELOW >>>

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aaron tumbleson
8 years ago

Muscle confusion, by not going through the same routine weeek after week letting your body adapt to a specific set of exercises and drills. change it up or …if you will [mix it up] also constant repitition with appropriate eating habbits, changing the intensity of the workout, and and proper healing time, coupled with sheer will and determination. You can also try chaning the enviorment where you workout, instead of running at the gym run through the city, out in a national park, up a mountain …if their available to you, higher elivation is always a great way to go.

Patrick
Patrick
8 years ago

Well, sets, reps, weights and rest time are given. Aside from that there’s always ways to increase the difficulty in a program by changing exercises that work the same muscles – like swapping deads for one legged stiff legged deads. Or increasing the challenge, like going from push ups on the floor to push ups on a SB with elevated legs. Deload periods I believe to be important, as well as changing things up enough that you’re not de-motivated. These are more on the meta-level, I guess, but important nonetheless.

Mike
Mike
8 years ago

Variables to manipulate:

– Exercise selection
– Intensity (weight)
– # of repetitions
– # of sets
– Rest periods
– Tempo
And if you’re Jeff Anderson – Protein intake

Rob
Rob
9 years ago

Frequency, Intensity, and Type of exercise should be changed about every 4-6 weeks depending on athlete level (beg,int,adv). Beginners will see much more improvement early on (1st 6wks) from neural innervation/activation alone. 1st and foremost, have a goal and a plan to reach that goal.

tony
9 years ago

variation is the spice of life, every 2-4 weeks change exercise programs, think outside box.

Ian M
Ian M
9 years ago

-Ensure that you mix up your exercises before you get too used to doing the same ones everytime (i.e. don’t bench press every week for 8 weeks) -Periodization. Yeah I stole that word from you Eric, but I’ve been finding that it’s very important. A good work to rest ratio helps recovery which allows you to perform better during the workouts. -Sounds simple but be serious in the gym. Don’t have headphones, don’t mingle excessively and get in your mental zone (mushin if you will). It’s hard to workout properly when your head isn’t in the game. -Part of the above kinda, but keep the workouts intense. There’s no reason to lift weights for 2 hours. Instead make it a more intense 1 hour routine. -Mix up plyometric vs static vs heavy weights. Often overlooked I think. -Make sure to include a warm-up and pre/post stretch routines. Cool idea Eric,… Read more »

Ian M
Ian M
9 years ago
Reply to  Ian M

Also I just wanted to say that all bias aside (for purchasing your ebooks and coming here) but I really hope Bocek and Patrick win. Bocek bc Nik Lentz has his coming. Also I feel Mark is an underrated LW with a beautiful groundgame, yeah i said beautiful. Claude Patrick bc I love his calculated, well rounded approach and a win over Ebersole would be a huge boost. Best of luck guys!

Paulius
Paulius
9 years ago

Exercises/time/intensity

landon
landon
9 years ago

Variables:
1. Decrease/Increase Rest times
2. Increase weight
3. Increase reps/T.U.T
Variations on intensity stop plateaus.

Randy G
Randy G
9 years ago

I think the best thing’s to do are 1. Stick to exercises and stretches which are proven to work. 2. Keep your body guessing (easier said then done). 3. Work out hard, but stay within your limits and use proper form. 4. Eat correctly according to your daily routine. Keep it changing as your routines change. 5. Make sure to incorporate stretching into your work out schedule as it promotes blood flow to your muscles providing nutrients for healing among many other benefits. 6. Rest, Your body grows the most when it is healing. This is just as important as diet and exercise. 7.(kind of goes with #6) Every couple months, take 1-2 weeks off from training. It takes about 6 weeks for your body to lose muscle so its not going anywhere but when you hit the gym again, its going to feel like it and it will shock… Read more »

Chris
Chris
9 years ago

I think it’s always mixing up routines so you don’t get bored doing the same exercises and they wont be stale so it’s always best to challenge your body and take your body to the next level so that your challenging the neural system every time you do new exercises the body isn’t used to. Always keep your muscles guessing so it doesn’t know what hit them and vary routines from time to time.

Joshua
Joshua
9 years ago

My understanding is that the most important things is variety and the intensity of the workouts, because you have to change what exercises your doing so your body isn’t experiencing the same kind of stress in the exact same way as always. My only example of this is that you’ll notice sometimes how much harder it is to do a new exercise than a frequently used exercise, because you don’t have the neural pathways. At least that’s my understanding.

Joshua
Joshua
9 years ago
Reply to  Joshua

sorry if my post was a little scatter brained

Sam
Sam
9 years ago
Reply to  Joshua

Not scatter brained AT ALL, man. Very important variable I forgot..

Danavir
Danavir
9 years ago

An exercise program consists of the training variables and the exercises themselves. From the very start of a program, there is adaptation due to the new stimulus (the addition of exercise and reps/rest…etc As someone goes into the program, the body adapts to it. It takes about 4-6 repeated sessions, using the same program for the body to adapt (About 4-6 weeks). Depending on the goals of the program and of the particular phase of the program itself, different variables will be modified. In MMA (and just about all sports), maximal strength is the most important factor to bring all other qualities up such as power and endurance. Strength in general can be increased through increase neuromuscular efficiency and/or increased muscle size. In MMA, relative strength is extremely important, so there is an emphasis on neuromuscular efficiency unless of course one of the fighters needs is to build more muscle.… Read more »

Ken
Ken
9 years ago
Reply to  Danavir

What he said

Eric
9 years ago
Reply to  Ken

Second that. 🙂

Sam
Sam
9 years ago

Time, frequency, duration, “appropriateness” (specific to goal), recovery periods during exercise and/or interval design, adequate rest between sessions, 40-30-30 optimized nutrition, adequate hydration, and as Paul points out, a modern periodization scheme (which I’m guessing is a major part of your program, Eric 🙂

MIke
MIke
9 years ago

With weight training, a way to continue to make progress is to only add 1 lb to the bar every session (if you add 5 lbs to the bar in every session, you will plateau fast)

Paul F.
Paul F.
9 years ago

Perodization is the number one way not to plateau. Keep switching up the workouts to improve endurance, strength, and power every 4-8 weeks usual helps with athletes to adapt and constantly improve.

Ferg
Ferg
9 years ago

Wow, congratulations on being part of the camp for two UFC fighters Eric, can we expect a cage-side appearance from you?

To force the human body to adapt, my failsafe would be some variation on escalating density, same work, less time or more work in the same time.

Eric
9 years ago
Reply to  Ferg

Won’t be cage-side, but might be able to make it on TV, we’ll see… 🙂

Omar
Omar
9 years ago

From my understanding, we can mostly avoid plateau by changing the repetition scheme in exercises, rather than the exercises themselves.

There is the strength gain 1-3 reps per set, weight gain 4-8 reps per set and finally the endurance of which is 12-25 reps per set.

If you are able to manipulate the training program to go through these different repetition schemes, you will continue to make gains, perhaps indefinitely.

A good way to do it is to cut 1/3rds your program into either one of these rep schemes and rotate regularly.

– Omar